621 posts in News

Feb 13, 2018 / News / jcmoore

Artist Rachel Lodge Explores the Carbon Cycle at Miller Library

Imagining the Carbon Cycle with Rachel Lodge
Artist Talk on MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2018, 6 – 7PM

Artist Rachel Lodge will speak about her motivations for making her animation series explaining the carbon cycle and the process she used to create the art works.
The Miller Library is open until 8pm on Mondays so guests can view the exhibit before or after the lecture. 

Read more

Colorful Willows and Dogwoods for Winter

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, February 5 - 18, 2018

1)  Salix  ‘Swizzlestick’                   Corkscrew Willow

Thrives in wet locations and is salt tolerant.
Orange-yellow young twigs that have a corkscrew growth pattern
Cut back hard in spring to promote attractive new branches.

2)  Cornus sericea  ‘Flaviramea’ Yellow Twig Dogwood

Medium to large, deciduous shrub
Bright yellow-green young twigs easily grown in medium-to-wet soils in full sun or part shade.
Species native to North America (excluding lower mid-west and deep south)

3)  Salix alba  ‘Britzensis’             Coral Bark Willow

Fast growing to 80 feet tall, but may be coppiced each spring. 

Read more

Feb 7, 2018 / Personal Profiles, News / Desirae Hayes-Vitor, UW student intern

Faculty Spotlight: Professor Emeritus Robert Gara

 
Professor Emeritus Robert Gara spent nearly 40 years as Professor of Entomology at the UW’s College of Forest Resources (now the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences). He served as an advisor to graduate students on their horticulture projects at the Center for Urban Horticulture. Let’s learn a little more about his background…
Q: What are some of your hobbies or passions outside of work? 

Read more

Glimpse into the past – the Miller Library Legacy of Lyn Sauter

Lyn Sauter

The Northwest lost a pioneer in horticulture, native plants, and libraries on December 14, 2017, when Lyn Sauter passed. Born in Snoqualmie Falls, WA, she first earned a degree in Chemistry at Seattle University. She then met her husband, Hansjoerg Sauter, a German medical resident. They married and had four children. She then returned to the University of Washington where she earned a graduate degree in Library Science, a field she pursued for the rest of her life. 

Read more

Color in Winter at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, January 22 - February 1, 2018

1)   Sarcococca hookeriana var. digyna                     Sweet Box

Evergreen, rhizomatous, suckering shrub
Purplish stems with narrowly lanceolate, mid-green leaves and clusters of small, creamy-white, fragrant flowers
Native to western China

2)   Hamamelis mollis                      Chinese Witch Hazel

Medium-to-large, deciduous shrub
Fragrant yellow flowers often with a red base, with four ribbon-shaped petals that grow in clusters
Native to central and eastern China

3)   Daphne bholua  ‘Jacqueline Postill’                     Bhulu Swa, Nepalese Paper plant

Evergreen shrub
Leathery leaves and deep pink flowers with a powerful fragrance
Native to the Himalayas and neighboring mountain ranges from Nepal to southern China

4)   Garrya elliptica  ‘James Roof’                    Silk Tassel

Evergreen shrub to small tree
Yellowish-colored, male catkins that dangle 12″ or more from the ends of the branches in winter to early spring and turn gray as they age. 

Read more

Student Spotlight: Sage Stowell

Sage Stowell is a graduate student at UW in the Masters of Environmental Horticulture program. Much of her coursework takes place in UW Botanic Gardens facilities at the Center for Urban Horticulture, where she enjoys the beautiful space while learning. She grew up in the mountains outside of Nederland, Colorado, and completed a BA in Environmental Studies at the University of Montana. 

Read more

Jan 27, 2018 / News / Jessica Farmer

Do you know ecoPRO?

ecoPRO logo

Unfortunately, the March 5-9 training and test have been cancelled due to low registration numbers. Please mark your calendars for the next scheduled training, October 23-36, 2018, in Puyallup: http://www.wsnla.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1072870&group

 

More residents and property managers are requesting sustainable landscape design, construction, and maintenance. ecoPRO certified professionals ensure knowledgeable, profitable, and environmentally-sound landscape design, installation and maintenance services. UW Botanic Gardens is excited to be offering this new educational opportunity this spring for landscape professionals with a passion for both beauty and responsible environmental practices. 

Read more

January 2018 Plant Profile: Salix fargesii

Salix fargesii buds

Species: Salix fargesii
Family: Salicaceae
Common Name: Chinese willow, Farges willow
Award of Garden Merit by the Royal Horticultural Society: 2012
This very attractive willow was “discovered” by Isaac Henry Burkill in 1899 and introduced to the west from central China in 1910 by E.H. Wilson. In 1908 Wilson collected his specimens in the woodlands near Fang Hsien at an altitude of 6000 feet. 

Read more

December Plant Profile: Liquidambar styraciflua

Common Name: Sweetgum 
Family: Altingiaceae
Locations: there are 12 of these trees in our collection: for specific locations check our Living Collections database We also have some of the Asian species; Liquidambar acalycina, Liquidambar formosana and Liquidambar orientalis
Origin: Eastern, southeast and lower central United States, Mexico and Central America.
Height and Spread: to150 feet in the wild and 60-80 feet in cultivation
After our last couple weeks of wind storms most of the leaves have been blown from the trees. 

Read more

Fine Fall Food for Our Feathered and Feelered Friends

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, (November 20, 2017 - December 4, 2017)

1)   Arbutus unedo           Strawberry Tree

Arbutus unedo specimens can be found surrounding the courtyard on the south side of the Graham Visitors Center.
As the fruit requires 12 months to ripen, both flowers and ripe fruit are present in the fall for an excellent display as well as food for both pollinators and other wildlife.
Varied thrush visit our courtyard in the winter to take advantage of the dense cover and fruit. 

Read more
Back to Top