584 posts in News

Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum in May 2017

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, May 8 - 21, 2017

1)   Azara lanceolata

This large shrub is native to Chile and Argentina.
In spring, it is covered with fragrant yellow flowers.
Azara lanceolata can be found near parking lots #4 and #5 along Arboretum Drive.

2)   Cytisus x praecox                Broom

C. multiflorus x C. purgans
Pale yellow flowers are produced in axillary clusters.
Many Brooms and related plants are blooming now along Arboretum Drive in our legume collection. 

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Spring – Better Late Than Never!

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, April 24, 2017 - May 7, 2017

 
1)   Acer palmatum  ‘Beni-maiko’                     Japanese Maple

The name Beni-maiko means “red dancing girl”, referring to the brilliant red-to-pinkish foliage that emerges in the spring.
This tree’s current color stands out vibrantly in the Woodland Garden.
Beni-maiko has been recognized by the Royal Horticulture Society and given the Award of Garden Merit for several recent years.

 
2)   Erica arborea                     Tree Heath/Giant Heather

Erica arborea is native to Africa, having populations in the Ethiopian Highlands, mountains of Ruwenzori, and the Cameroon Mountains. 

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Apr 27, 2017 / History, Washington Park Arboretum, News / John A Wott, Director emeritus

Glimpse into the past – What a difference a day makes!

Aerial view of University of Washington Campus, 1940

There is a song which I used to sing all the time, “What a Difference a Day Makes”! Every day, the news is filled with stories about new plans to increase density and building heights in the city of Seattle, and especially in the University District. The University of Washington has just released a new Campus Master Plan which also increases building density and height. 

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Apr 27, 2017 / News / David Zuckerman

Earth Day 2017 in the Arboretum with Student Conservation Association

Our eleventh Arboretum Earth Day event partnering with Student Conservation Association was the largest ever with 340 total participants!
Opening ceremony speakers representing the three Washington Park Arboretum partners; Paige Miller, Executive Director of Arboretum Foundation; Elizabeth Van Volkenberg, Interim Director of UW School of Environmental Sciences (UW Botanic Gardens academic arm); and Christopher Williams, Seattle City Parks and Recreation Deputy Superintendent addressed the attentive crowd of eager volunteers of how valuable our Arboretum is to the local community and the importance of continual community stewardship. 

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Apr 20, 2017 / News / Jessica Farmer

Participate in a Seattle Parks Study

Seattle Parks and Recreation is undertaking a project to learn of ways to improve the specialty gardens in the Park system, including the Washington Park Arboretum. The project is funded by the Specialty Gardens division of the Seattle Parks Department and is being conducted by HR2 Research and Analytics.
HR2 Research and Analytics are conducting focus groups, with a $25 compensation (participants must confirm attendance with Haley Brown at hbrown@hr2researchandanalytics.com or 425-777-6718 -to receive compensation and ensure seating). 

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“Pretty please, with a cherry on top!”

Selected cherry tree specimens from the Azalea Way Promenade at the Washington Park Arboretum (April 10-23, 2017)

The following are five of the best flowering cherries suitable for growing in the Pacific Northwest. All have good resistance to brown rot blossom blight disease and are good choices size-wise for the home garden.  All specimens below are currently in some stage of flowering along our historic Azalea Way Promenade.
1)   Prunus  x yedoensis  ‘Akebono’                 Daybreak Yoshino Cherry

‘Akebono’ (“Daybreak”) – This form has pinker flowers than the original Yoshino-type, and the petals are more frilled. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (March 27 - April 9, 2017)

1)   Acer triflorum                Three Flower Maple

A small, slow-growing deciduous 20’ to 45’ tree, where it is native to Manchuria and Korea. An excellent landscape tree boasting light-grey vertically furrowed bark and vivid red and orange fall color. The specific epithet makes reference to its flowers, which are borne in clusters of three.
This tree was discovered by noted plant explorer, Ernest H. 

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Mar 30, 2017 / Miller Library, News / Brian Thompson, Miller Library Manager

Award Winning Horticulture Books Announced

AHS book award logo

The American Horticultural Society has announced the five winners of their 2017 Book Awards.  Read about these great new books and visit the Miller Library to check them out.
The seven-member award review committee consisted of horticulturists, garden book writers and publicists, and one horticultural librarian (me!) from across the country.  We met virtually and by conference call in January to review some 40 nominees – it was both an exciting and challenging project. 

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Mar 27, 2017 / Center for Urban Horticulture, Miller Library, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

Glimpse into the past – Honoring the Career of Valerie Easton

The long-term success of an institution often resides in the vision, dexterity, intellect, ambition and intuitiveness of an individual. On February 22, 2017, Valerie Easton announced that she was no longer writing her weekly column in the Pacific NW Magazine, bringing her 25 year career there to an end. For me, it seems like Val only recently started as the Library Manager at the Elisabeth C. 

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Spring Arrives at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum , March 13 - 20, 2017

1)   Cornus mas                     Cornellian Cherry

A native of Europe, C. mas has been cultivated for centuries in Britain. Flowers are produced in February and March on the leafless stems in short-stalked umbels from the joints of the previous year’s wood.
Oblong-ellipsoid, fleshy, bright red fruit are produced in late summer, and are edible when ripe.
Found throughout the Arboretum, these shrubs or small trees are easily identified at this time. 

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