125 posts in Plant Profiles

November 2017 Plant Profile: Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii ‘Profusion’

Callicarpa bodinieri var. giraldii 'Profusion'

If you’re looking for a plant that will provide you and your neighbors with a “Wow” reaction during several seasons then you should consider beautyberry ‘Profusion’.

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Sep 29, 2017 / UW Farm, Plant Profiles / Alice VanderHaak

October 2017 Plant Profile: Apium graveolens var. rapaceum

hand holding Celery Root

UW Farm is now harvesting celeriac, also known as celery root – a great addition to your rotation of fall root foods!

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Aug 31, 2017 / Plant Profiles / David Zuckerman

September 2017 Plant Profile – Clethra fargesii

When it comes to outstanding summer flowering shrubs for PNW gardens, one should not overlook the genus Clethra. Clethra is a genus of about 75 species, mostly native to south and east Asia and the Americas.  It is one of two genera in the Clethraceae, which is closely related to the Ericaceae (Heather family).  They prefer lime-free soil and produce white, fragrant flowers in long racemes or panicles in July or August. 

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August 2017 Plant Profile: Oxydendrum arboreum

Oxydendrum arboreum is a beautiful summer flowering tree with dramatic fall foliage.

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July Plant Profile: Hydrangea integrifolia

Originally posted July 1, 2014
An evergreen hydrangea?!!  You betcha!
There are very few evergreen vines for gardeners in the Pacific Northwest, but this gorgeous gem from Asia is  becoming more readily available and it’s simply one of the coolest flowers you’ll ever get to witness opening.
From plump, peony-like buds, they begin to slowly crack open, a froth of fertile flowers begin to form and over the course of a few days, a flat umbel “lacecap” begins to form. 

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Jun 7, 2017 / What is Growing, Washington Park Arboretum, Plant Profiles, Education, News / Catherine Nelson, Tour Program Assistant

June “Plant” Profile: Discovering Slime Molds

Fuligo septica by Flickr user Scot Nelson

This month, instead of profiling a plant, we’ll be profiling a completely different kind of organism… slime molds!
In the fall of 2015, the Elisabeth C. Miller Library at the Center for Urban Horticulture held an art exhibit about slime molds: Now You See It, the Slime Mold Revelation! I had never head of these organisms and was intrigued by the art display and the amazing enlarged photographs of their fruiting bodies. 

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Apr 24, 2017 / Plant Profiles / Annie Bilotta

May 2017 Plant Profile: Taxodium distichum var. imbricatum

bald cypress cone

Is that dead looking conifer coming back to life? If it’s a pond cypress that delicate new green growth is a normal part of this deciduous conifer’s life cycle.

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April 2017 Plant Profile: Corylopsis pauciflora

 
Corylopsis pauciflora, the buttercup winter hazel, is one of the most charming plants in the witch hazel family.  It features unique and colorful leaves, attractive and lightly fragrant flowers, fall color and is a good size for smaller gardens.  It is the smallest and most compact growing member of the genus.  The genus name means resembling (“opsis”) the leaf of a Corylus, or common hazel (though they are not related).   

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Mar 1, 2017 / Plant Profiles, News / Daniel Sorensen

March 2017 Plant Profile: Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster may not be the first plant that you notice in the landscape, but it might be the plant keeps your attention the longest. This plant’s divaricate branching (having branches of wide angles) and its tiny dark evergreen leaves give it a sparse and angular look which is not a common sight among the green gardens in the Pacific Northwest. 

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February 2017 Plant Profile: Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’

flowers of Hamamelis 'Jelena'

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’ has long been one of the most popular of the hybrid witch hazels.  Flowers appear as a bright copper-orange from a distance.  Closer inspection reveals a bicolored flower, being reddish at the base but changing to more of an orange yellow at the tip.  Although it has relatively little scent compared to the intoxicatingly fragrant Hamamelis mollis, it is prized for its flower color.   

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