621 posts in News

Nov 10, 2017 / Washington Park Arboretum, News / UWBG Communication Staff

Washington Park Arboretum Loop Trail Open To Public Nov. 10

We are excited to announce that the new Arboretum Loop Trail on the west side of Azalea Way will open to cyclists and pedestrians on Friday, November 10.

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Fall and Winter Interests at the Washington Park Arboretum

Fall and Winter Interests at the Washington Park Arboretum, November 7-20, 2017

1)   Acer triflorum                              Three-flowered Maple

This is a small to medium-sized tree, native to northeastern China and Korea.
Exfoliating bark, three leaflets, and amazing fall color are some highlights of this tree.
Look for this tree, with one of the last displays of fall color for the season, in the Asiatic Maples collection.

2)   Callicarpa bodinieri                   Beautyberry

Most species in the genus, including this one, come from eastern and southeastern Asia, although this species can be found in Australia, Madagascar, North America, and South America. 

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Oct 27, 2017 / Horticulture, News / UWBG Horticulturist

A Fall Color Extravaganza is Happening in the Woodland Garden!

Outdoor photo of the Woodland Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum

Don’t delay, get your free “leaf peeper” tickets today!  See the most beautiful fall color show in Seattle.  Located in Woodland Garden on the south-facing slope (north side of Upper Pond).  And the star performers are:
 
1)   Acer palmatum  ‘Ogon sarasa’

A Japanese maple cultivar whose name means “gold calico cloth”.
This shorter-statured large shrub is in the lower right foreground when viewing scene from the south side of Upper Pond. 

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West Side Story

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 9 - 22, 2017)

1)   Cedrus atlantica ‘Aurea’

Native to the Atlas Mountains of Morocco and Algeria, C. atlantica ‘Aurea’ is a slow-growing, conical tree with golden yellow foliage. As the tree matures, its needles turn to a greener color.
Atlas cedars can grow to 120 feet in height, but this cultivar tops out at about half that.
A member of the Pinaceae (Pine family), this specimen is located in the north Pinetum near 26th Avenue East and East McGraw Street. 

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Reflections of a Rare Care intern: Wading through head-high nettles and scarifying seeds

Myesa Legendre-Fixx spent the summer as an intern for the Rare Plant Care and Conservation Program (Rare Care). She completed her Bachelor of Science in Biology and Oceanography at UW June 2017.
Working as a Rare Care intern has been a thrilling summer! Over the summer, Ceci and I monitored 17 different plant populations, did 10 seed collections, worked with the US Bureau of Land Management doing rare plant and weed surveys and fire severity assessments of burned areas, improved the seed vault and started almost 500 seeds of Whited’s milk-vetch (Astragalus sinuatus) for an outplanting. 

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September’s Super Days Of Service In The Arboretum

Thanks to spot on planning and recruitment by our partner, Arboretum Foundation, and cooperative PNW weather, two of our biggest community service events during the year were a huge success!
We celebrated United Way Day of Caring on September 15, when 130 volunteers representing 6 companies; Nordstrom, Sonos, Fred Hutch, Google, IMPINJ, Microsoft and Chase Bank, participated in 7 arboretum projects led by UW Botanic Gardens horticulture and Seattle Parks and Recreation staff. 

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John A. Wott Fellowship Awarded to Ryan Garrison

The John A. Wott Botanic Gardens Endowed Fellowship was awarded this fall to Ryan Garrison, a master’s student in the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences.
Ryan was born and raised in Jackson, Michigan. His father’s love of plants and nature, and both his parents’ teaching professions set the foundation for a lifetime of growing plants and appreciating the value of learning. 

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Aug 30, 2017 / History, Washington Park Arboretum, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

Glimpse into the past – Duck Bay and Shoreline Restoration

Establishing new shoreline

The water level in Lake Washington dropped an average of nine feet in 1916, when the complete set of canals and locks for increased shipping were completed. Much more land around the edges of Union Bay was then exposed, all of it soft and boggy. The City of Seattle had long used the low spots in various parks as dump sites, which is why artifacts are often found in low areas throughout Washington Park Arboretum. 

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Summer Fruit from the Washington Park Arboretum

Close-up photo of the various Magnolia fruit

1)   Corylus colurna                     Turkish Hazel

This native of SE Europe produces edible nuts inside intricately beaked husks.
This Corylus and other Birch Family members can be found near the terminus of Foster Island Road.

2)   Dipteronia sinensis

Dipteronia is a member of the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, which also includes Acer or maples, another winged-fruited genus.
As fall approaches, the fruit of Dipteronia will continue to ripen to a reddish-brown color. 

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Summer Interests from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 31, 2017 - August 14, 2017)

1)   Abies concolor                     White Fir

This tall conifer, native to the mountains of western North America, adds an interesting silvery blue backdrop to our Legume collection.
The young trees are valuable in the Christmas tree trade for their ornamental look.
The specimens in grid 16-6E were planted in 1938.

2)   Acer davidii                     David’s Maple

This tree is named in honor of French priest and naturalist Armand David, who first described the species while on mission in central China. 

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