598 posts in News

The New Zealand Dead Look

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, January 17 - 31, 2017

New Zealand has a large number of shrubs with small tough leaves and wiry interlacing branches – divaricates. Some even have brown or grey new growth, giving a dead-like appearance. It is suggested that this may be a defensive mechanism to deter browsing moa (extinct flightless birds).
1)  Coprosma propinqua                (Mingimingi)

A visiting New Zealand scholar once described Coprosma as “a genus without morals that hybridizes incessantly” as she was politely telling us she didn’t think we were actually growing true Coprosma propinqua. 

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Progress on the new Arboretum Loop Trail

If you’ve recently visited the Washington Park Arboretum, you may have noticed the new Arboretum Loop Trail is taking shape. Crews have continued to make progress through a very wet fall and cold winter, and they hope to open the first section in mid-February.
Part of the Arboretum’s long-term Master Plan, the project creates 1.2 miles of new trail, completing a 2.5 mile loop. 

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Helping Gardens Grow: How volunteers nurture new plants to support the Arboretum Foundation

If you’ve ever wandered the Washington Park Arboretum delighting in the year-round plant displays and wishing you could take a piece of the experience home, then be sure to explore the Pat Calvert Greenhouse on your next visit.
The greenhouse—and the volunteer effort behind it—were established by its namesake in 1959. Pat Calvert was inspired to create a space for Arboretum Foundation members to practice propagation, and she worked with the Foundation to secure funds to build the structure and start the program. 

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Jan 10, 2017 / Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

A glimpse into the past – a Volunteer Thank You

University of Washington Botanic Gardens staff preparing and serving the food.

All non-profit organizations live and breathe with volunteers. The University of Washington Botanic Gardens counts on hundreds of volunteers and has prospered with their help for over 75 years. The major support group for the Washington Park Arboretum is the Arboretum Foundation, and the Northwest Horticultural Society supports many aspects of the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Elisabeth C. Miller Library. 

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Jan 10, 2017 / News / Wendy Gibble

Plant Conservation Internships with Rare Care

Washington Rare Plant Care and Conservation (Rare Care) at the University of Washington Botanic Gardens is accepting applications for two internship positions available for the spring and summer of 2017. Interns will work on a broad array of plant conservation science projects on public lands in Washington and gain familiarity with the tools used to manage sensitive plant species.
Rare Care is dedicated to conserving Washington’s native rare plants through methods including ex situ conservation, reintroduction, research, rare plant monitoring, and education.We build partnerships with public agencies and non-governmental organizations to manage and conserve rare native plant species. 

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2017 UW Student Farm Staff Positions

The University of Washington Farm (UW Farm) is a student-run farm on the UW-Seattle campus. The mission of the UW Farm is to be the campus center for the practice and study of urban agriculture and sustainability, and an educational, community-oriented resource for people who want to learn about building productive and sustainable urban landscapes.
With three farming locations on campus, the UW Farm offers year-round vegetable production for Housing and Food Services, a 50-member Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, and the University of Washington Food Pantry. 

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Jan 4, 2017 / News / UWBG Communication Staff

UW Opens Search for New Botanic Gardens Director

The UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences opened the application process for the tenure track faculty position of Director for the UW Botanic Gardens. The position is open until filled.
UWBG has an international reputation for horticulture, restoration ecology, urban forestry, sustainable urban systems, conservation and plant collections.  It manages 320 acres of collections and research areas, has a staff of over 40, and an annual budget of $2.7 million.

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Jan 4, 2017 / News / Rare Care

Symbols of resilience for a new year

Astragalus misellus var. pauper

If you’re looking for a symbol of resilience and survival for the new year – perhaps, even, a symbol of the ability to endure trial by fire with beauty and grace – consider Whited’s penstemon, pauper milk-vetch, yellow lady’s slipper or the dwarf evening-primrose.
During the 2016 monitoring season, several agency partners asked Rare Care to devote monitoring efforts to populations affected by 2014 and 2015 wildfires that burned approximately 1 1/2 million acres. 

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Winter Quarter Native Plant Nursery Internships

The UW student chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration’s (SER-UW) native plant nursery is located on campus at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH). It is a student run operation that provides plants to the on-campus restoration projects that SER-UW manages. This year, with the support of a Campus Sustainability Fund grant, the nursery is expanding by developing experiments and curriculum on plant propagation and production. 

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Nov 29, 2016 / Washington Park Arboretum, Education, Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

Glimpse into the past – Puget Sound Rhododendron Hybrid Garden

Since the late 1930s, the Puget Sound region has been regarded by some as the best rhododendron growing region in the U.S.A., with documentation for over 2000 hybrid rhododendrons. Washington Park Arboretum has always been a leader in showcasing rhododendrons, including species and hybrids. The hybridization of rhododendrons was one of the legacies of both the former curator, Joe Witt, and the former director Brian O. 

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