618 posts in News

Student Spotlight: Joe Neumann Restores Vegetation and Habitat in the Union Bay Natural Area

Joe Neumann is completing a Master of Environmental Horticulture degree program at the University of Washington. He’s been working to restore different sites in the Union Bay Natural Area along the western shore of Lake Washington at the Center for Urban Horticulture. The restoration project includes clearing invasive plants and establishing native plants on three main sites to create healthy habitats for plant and animal life. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum for June 2018

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, June 4 - 17, 2018

1)  Kalmia latifolia                     Mountain Laurel

This attractive evergreen shrub is native to the eastern United States.
Has five-sided cup-shaped clusters of pink flowers.
The name honors Pehr Kalm (1715-1779) and latifoliia means “Broad Leafed”.

2)  Rhododendron occidentale                     Western Azalea

This deciduous shrub is native to the coasts of central and southern Oregon and California.
Fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers are borne in trusses and vary from white to pale rose, with or without a yellow blotch and sometimes streaked with darker rose markings. 

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June 2018 Plant Profile: finding the story of our George Washington Elm

The Washington Park Arboretum has two large Ulmus americana in the collection: one of which, the “George Washington” elm, is a historic American tree.

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John A. Wott Fellowship Awarded to Sarah Shank

The John A. Wott Botanic Gardens Endowed Fellowship was awarded this spring to Sarah Shank, a first-year Master of Environmental Horticulture student at the University of Washington School of Environmental and Forest Sciences.
A native of Pennsylvania, Sarah recently moved to Seattle for graduate school and is enjoying the opportunity to learn about the diverse flora of the Pacific Northwest. Although she pursued a fine arts degree, she worked as a gardener throughout her undergraduate career and eventually found her way back to horticulture post-graduation as a nursery horticulturist.  

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, May 21, 2018 - June 3, 2018

1)  Enkianthus campanulatus                    Redvein Enkianthus

This attractive deciduous shrub is native to open woodlands in Japan.
Tiny bell-shaped, creamy-yellow to reddish flowers held together in clusters.
Small elliptic leaves turning bright red, orange and yellow in the fall.

2)  Davidia involucrata                     Handkerchief Tree

This deciduous tree is native to woodlands in central China.
Its small, reddish purple flower heads are surrounded by a pair of large, white bracts up to 30 cm. 

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Staff Spotlight: Stacy Kinsell

Stacy Kinsell is the Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator for the Rare Plant Care and Conservation Program (Rare Care), but it hasn’t been a straightforward path to get there. Kinsell’s undergraduate work was in social work and urban studies. After school, she packed up for an adventure in a new city far away from her native Georgia and moved to Seattle. She quickly fell in love with the city, but not the career and after a few years of working in her new field, Kinsell was feeling burnt out. 

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Two New Ways to Experience the Arboretum

We are excited to introduce two new ways of experiencing the Arboretum.
For a more active person, we are offering Arboretum Running Tours. We’ll combine exercise, education, and entertainment on a fun running tour through the Arboretum, one of Seattle’s Olmsted Parks and home to the University of Washington Botanic Gardens’ world-class plant collections. You’ll learn about the history and design of the park, a few choice plants, and traditional or modern uses of various plants along the route. 

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Apr 13, 2018 / Herbarium, Research, News / Stacy Kinsell

Highlights from the 2018 Washington Botanical Symposium

The UW Botanic Gardens, in conjunction with the University of Washington Herbarium at the Burke Museum, hosted another successful symposium that brought together professionals, academics, and botanists from around the Pacific Northwest to share knowledge and celebrate Washington State’s flora. The full day event was coordinated by a diverse group including Washington Noxious Weed Control Board, Washington Native Plant Society, Seattle Public Utilities, Washington Natural Heritage Program, US Forest Service, and Washington Bureau of Land Management. 

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Apr 11, 2018 / Miller Library, News / Tracy Mehlin

Local horticultural publications digitized

Screenshot of BHL interface

In 2017 the Elisabeth C. Miller Library participated in a digitization grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded to the Biodiversity Heritage Library. 777 individual journal issues were scanned by the Internet Archive from 14 titles published by 4 organizations. Now the historic and recent issues of newsletters published by the Hardy Fern Foundation, Arboretum Foundation, Northwest Horticultural Society and the University of Washington Botanic Gardens are available for the world to read. 

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Selected cuttings make their appearance in late March at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, March 19, 2018 - April 1, 2018

1)  Berberis darwinii                     Darwin’s Barberry

This barberry was discovered in Chile by Charles Darwin in 1835 during his voyage on the Beagle.
Located in the Chilean entry garden of the Pacific Connections Garden, the red-tinted flower buds open to bright yellow-orange flowers.
The abundant summer fruit of this barberry is sweet and delicious as opposed to our native sour barberries (mahonias). 

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