131 posts in Plant Profiles

July 2011 Plant Profile: Triteleia (Brodiaea)

Triteleia are somewhat of a taxonomic nightmare, but truly a much overlooked summer flowering bulb!

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June 2011 Plant Profile: Glumicalyx goseloides

Walking down the Soest Garden path, it’s very easy to miss seeing Nodding Chocolate Flower, a remarkable perennial plant all the way from South Africa.

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May 2011 Plant Profile: Daphne x transatlantica ‘Summer Ice’

Daphne ‘Summer Ice’ is becoming a widely recognized small shrub for the Pacific Northwest. It’s dependable, easy to care for, once established, and possesses fine qualities as such persistent leaves (for the most part) and wonderfully sweet fragrance that’s present almost year round.

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April 2011 Plant Profile: Osmanthus delavayi

One of the most useful and attractive evergreen shrubs for the Pacific Northwest, this fragrant, spring blooming gem is hardy, easy to grow and highly adaptable to our climate.

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March 2011 Plant Profile: The Genus Helleborus

The popularity of this tough and resilient perennial has made it one of the most revered and sought after of all winter blooming plants in our climate.

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February 2011 Plant Profile: The Genus Galanthus

Of all spring emphemeral bulbs, Galanthus have been revered and loved for many centuries and have always been the harbingers of spring as their noses poke up and their gentle blossoms push through the snow.

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January 2011 Plant Profile: Cornus sericea ‘Flaviramea’

The winter landscape is incomplete without the presence of twig-dogwoods. Their stately, yet elegant stems, vibrant color and imposing form in the garden is remarkable. What’s more impressive is their adaptability and ease of growth. They are tolerant of most soils, are drought tolerant once established and the ability to recover from almost being mowed down to the ground each spring and produce brightly colored stems the following winter is extraordinary. 

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December 2010 Plant Profile: Prunus ‘Mount Vernon’

Contrary to its original form (Prunus laurocerasus), this selection of the common, overused and potentially invasive Cherry Laurel is a welcomed addition to any landscape. ‘Mt. Vernon’ is beginning to appear in many urban plantings both as a hugging evegreen groundcover or as a prostrate specimen shrub in front of a border. It is truly versatile, hardy, and a very dependable plant with glossy, deep green foliage that looks fabulous all year around. 

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November 2010 Plant Profile: Osmanthus fragrans v. aurantiacus

In the three years I’ve expected it to bite the dust, this plant has survived our winters and we’ve enjoyed the fruity scent from this form of Sweet Olive every autumn. Osmanthus fragrans is a popular shrub/small tree in the warmer regions of the United states (USDA Zone 8 +) and in China, where it is highly revered and its scented autumn blossoms are used to scent and flavor tea. 

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October 2010 Plant Profile: Symphyotrichum (Aster) lateriflorum ‘Prince’

Symphyotrichum (Aster) lateriflorum ‘Prince’

A regular visitor to the garden recommended that I make sure that I profile a plant that would stop people on their tracks when they walk by it and for October of this year, I’ve selected a dashingly handsome Aster, or now properly known as Symphyotrichum lateriflorum ‘Prince’ thriving happily in Bed 8. After years of sulking in the same bed; but overtaken by other plants, I finally moved it where it would receive full sun and less competition and, oh boy, did it take off! 

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