70 posts in Center for Urban Horticulture

Landscapes on the Edge

snowberry planted on slope photo

UW Botanic Gardens’ conferences, seminars, and symposia offer academics, scientists and practitioners opportunities to learn about the latest research and expertise in plant-related fields and create a forum for collaboration among professionals working in urban forestry, restoration and sustainable landscape management. Read on to learn about our exciting 2016 fall seminar. We hope you can join us!
Introduction to Landscapes on the Edge
Design and Implementation of Landscape and Restoration Projects
on Puget Sound Shorelines and Urban Ravines

Co-hosted by Greenbelt Consulting and University of Washington Botanic Gardens

November 15 & 16, 2016, 9am – 4pm
Center for Urban Horticulture
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, WA 98105
CEU’s approved: CPH-6/day, ecoPRO-6/day, WALP/NALP-6/day, ASCA-5, APLD-5 first day, 5.5 second day, ASLA-5/day, ISA – 5.5/day
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
This program is designed to educate landscape professionals about the vulnerable nature of marine shorelines and provide guidance and instruction on how to better initiate, design, and implement successful landscape and restoration projects on upland buffers, shorelines, steep slopes, and beaches. 

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Biology in the Wild

 
“I was amazed to learn that the Ginkgo biloba tree, which is thousands of years old but extinct in the wild, was saved by Buddhist monks who planted this tree in their monasteries so the species would live on!”
“We thought we would only hear the Latin names of a multitude of obscure plants,” she said, “but instead we heard amazing stories of survival and cooperation in nature.”
 
 
 
These were just two of the observations made by freshman and sophomore students who took one of the free guided tours at the Washington Park Arboretum.  

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Glimpse into the past – Honoring a Legend and Looking to the Future

by John A. Wott, Director Emeritus
For every creature – plants, animals, or people – there is a season. They are germinated/born, develop from juveniles into adults, usually produce progeny, grow into old age, and then succumb. In the plant kingdom, there are various ways in which plants reproduce, both sexually and asexually. In humans, we pass along our genetics, our ideas, and plans to successive generations. 

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Volunteer Spotlight: Carolyn Scott

At the University of Washington Botanic Gardens, we rely on volunteers–over 500 of them– to keep daily operations afloat.
Volunteer Carolyn Scott works in the administrative heart of the Gardens, helping Manager of Administrative Services Carrie Cone with record-keeping, mailing, filing and data entry.
Born in 1921, Carolyn came to Seattle from Virginia in her early 30s with husband David who accepted a faculty position with the (then) College of Forestry at the UW. 

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The Wonderful World of Monocots

Monocotyledons, commonly referred to as monocots, are flowering plants whose seeds typically contain only one embryonic leaf, or cotyledon.  A quarter of the world’s known plants are monocots. They are the most economically important group of plants to humans today in agriculture, horticulture, forestry and fiber industries.  Here are a few samples of monocots in our plant collections.
1)  Allium schubertii                                                                            (Ornamental Tumbleweed Onion)

Dried seed heads look like starry tumbleweeds or shooting star fireworks
Located in the Soest Herbaceous Display Garden, bed 6 at the Center for Urban Horticulture

2)  Austroderia richardii syn Cortedaria r.                      

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Faculty Spotlight: Tom Hinckley

Tom Hinckley no doubt kept his much younger graduate students challenged to  keep up as he climbed to over 7000′ on Snowshoe Mountain in the North Cascades. It was there he chose to conduct research on the effects of environmental stress on three species of native trees.
Hinckley needed that energy as he served both as Director for the UW Botanic Gardens’ Center for Urban Horticulture (1998-2004),  and as researcher, teacher and mentor at the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, where he is now emeritus professor. 

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Staff Spotlight: Jessica Anderson

Jessica Anderson is a librarian at the Elisabeth C. Miller Library at the University of Washington Botanic Gardens.  Most days you will see Jessica at the Reference desk, doing research or providing answers to gardening questions.
Jessica moved to Seattle from the Southwest to attend the University of Washington, earning her Masters in Library and Information Science in 2010.  As an undergraduate, Jessica began working at the Natural Sciences Library inside of the Suzzallo-Allen Library on the main campus.   

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Volunteer Spotlight: Heidi Lennstrom

Heidi volunteers at the Hyde Herbarium, working with pressed plants and the plant database.  She holds a PhD in archaeology, specializing in paleoethnobotany–the study of plant remains from archaeological digs.  She spent many years at the Bishop Museum in Hawaii, where she was also a science educator and creator of an ethnobotany garden and webpage. 
“I love to organize things,” says Lennstrom, “so working with the seven cabinets of duplicate specimens at the Herbarium is perfect for me!”
Heidi carefully identifies which of the specimens are duplicates, confirms they have been entered into the Botanic Garden website and  then determines which ones are kept and which ones need to be shared with other herbaria. 

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Student Spotlight: Emma Relei

In Emma Relei’s extensive list of “favorite” plants, one of them is the simple crocus, meaningful for her because of its prominence in a much-loved children’s tale, The Runaway Bunny;  another is Ponderosa pine, because “it smells like vanilla!”
Emma’s energy and enthusiasm for all things extends in many directions, including her work with specimens at the Hyde Herbarium. There she helps sort the 23,000+ species, catalogs them on the database, mounts species for filing and makes greeting cards. 

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