Mar 3, 2017 / Miller Library, Unit Feature / UWBG Communication Staff

Garden Lovers’ Book Sale April 7 & 8

Love gardening, plants, trees, flowers or growing food?
Can’t pass up a bargain?
Then you won’t want to miss the 12th annual GARDEN LOVERS’ BOOK SALE of used books at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

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Mar 1, 2017 / Plant Profiles, News / Daniel Sorensen

March 2017 Plant Profile: Corokia cotoneaster

Corokia cotoneaster may not be the first plant that you notice in the landscape, but it might be the plant keeps your attention the longest. This plant’s divaricate branching (having branches of wide angles) and its tiny dark evergreen leaves give it a sparse and angular look which is not a common sight among the green gardens in the Pacific Northwest. 

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Feb 23, 2017 / News / Dr. John Wott, Director emeritus

Glimpse into the past – Tree Care Then and Now

The Washington Park Arboretum has long been known as a “tree place.” In fact, two sister volunteers from Mercer Island (Lee Clark and Marion “Nukie” Fellows) were instrumental in getting bumper stickers printed in the 1990s which said “Tree Cheers for the Arboretum”. The Arboretum, as with every park in Seattle, has a matrix of native plants composed of the four primary Pacific Northwest forest trees: Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Western red cedar (Thuja plicata), Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), and Big-leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum). 

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Selected Cuttings from the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden (Part II)

Selected cuttings from the Joseph Witt Winter Garden, February 13 - 26, 2017

1)  Corylopsis glabrescens                                    Winter Hazel

This native of Korea and Japan teases us with flower buds that seem to be just on the edge of opening – for weeks!
The Joseph Witt Winter Garden contains multiple species of Corylopsis so that people may compare and appreciate the subtle differences in form and flower color the genus Corylopsis offers.

2)  Pieris japonica                                                          Lily of the Valley Shrub

The spring flowers and often the new growth of Pieris can be quite showy, but the buds themselves decorate our gardens throughout the winter months. 

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Feb 13, 2017 / Farm, News / raer3

SMEA postgraduate course: Fish in the global food system

SMEA postgraduate course, Spring 2017
Fish in the global food system SMEA 55OB (2 Credits)
*Fish is taken in the broadest sense to mean food from marine and aquatic ecosystems (i.e. finfish, shellfish, other aquatic and marine animals, and aquatic and marine plants)
Professor Edward H Allison/School of Marine and Environmental Affairs/College of the Environment/ Email: eha1@uw.edu
Zach Koehn/ PhD Student/School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences/ Email: zkoehn@uw.edu
Course Timetable:
All Fridays, from March 31st to June 2nd
10:00 – 12:00 am – Classroom sessions on 3/31, 4/7, 4/14, 4/28, 5/5, 5/12, 5/26, 6/2
Field visits (all or part-day – tbc) – 4/21, 5/19
Poster presentations: 6/2, 12:00 – 13:30
Optional: ‘Fish on Film’ evenings, once every 2 weeks  – timetable to be decided. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, January 30, 2017 - February 12, 2017

The Witt Winter Garden was originally designed and planted in 1949. In the late 1980s the garden was named after Joseph A. Witt, an Arboretum curator who had a special interest in winter ornamental plants. Here is a small sampling of plants to be enjoyed now in the Winter Garden.
Download a map and plant list at:
https://botanicgardens.uw.edu/washington-park-arboretum/gardens/joseph-a-witt-winter-garden/
1)   Chimonanthus praecox                (Wintersweet)

The 15’ tall arching stems host beautiful and aromatic creamy, yellowish flowers. 

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February 2017 Plant Profile: Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’

flowers of Hamamelis 'Jelena'

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’ has long been one of the most popular of the hybrid witch hazels.  Flowers appear as a bright copper-orange from a distance.  Closer inspection reveals a bicolored flower, being reddish at the base but changing to more of an orange yellow at the tip.  Although it has relatively little scent compared to the intoxicatingly fragrant Hamamelis mollis, it is prized for its flower color.   

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The New Zealand Dead Look

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, January 17 - 31, 2017

New Zealand has a large number of shrubs with small tough leaves and wiry interlacing branches – divaricates. Some even have brown or grey new growth, giving a dead-like appearance. It is suggested that this may be a defensive mechanism to deter browsing moa (extinct flightless birds).
1)  Coprosma propinqua                (Mingimingi)

A visiting New Zealand scholar once described Coprosma as “a genus without morals that hybridizes incessantly” as she was politely telling us she didn’t think we were actually growing true Coprosma propinqua. 

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Progress on the new Arboretum Loop Trail

If you’ve recently visited the Washington Park Arboretum, you may have noticed the new Arboretum Loop Trail is taking shape. Crews have continued to make progress through a very wet fall and cold winter, and they hope to open the first section in mid-February.
Part of the Arboretum’s long-term Master Plan, the project creates 1.2 miles of new trail, completing a 2.5 mile loop. 

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