Jan 10, 2017 / Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

A glimpse into the past – a Volunteer Thank You

University of Washington Botanic Gardens staff preparing and serving the food.

All non-profit organizations live and breathe with volunteers. The University of Washington Botanic Gardens counts on hundreds of volunteers and has prospered with their help for over 75 years. The major support group for the Washington Park Arboretum is the Arboretum Foundation, and the Northwest Horticultural Society supports many aspects of the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Elisabeth C. Miller Library. 

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Jan 10, 2017 / News / Wendy Gibble

Plant Conservation Internships with Rare Care

Washington Rare Plant Care and Conservation (Rare Care) at the University of Washington Botanic Gardens is accepting applications for two internship positions available for the spring and summer of 2017. Interns will work on a broad array of plant conservation science projects on public lands in Washington and gain familiarity with the tools used to manage sensitive plant species.
Rare Care is dedicated to conserving Washington’s native rare plants through methods including ex situ conservation, reintroduction, research, rare plant monitoring, and education.We build partnerships with public agencies and non-governmental organizations to manage and conserve rare native plant species. 

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2017 UW Student Farm Staff Positions

The University of Washington Farm (UW Farm) is a student-run farm on the UW-Seattle campus. The mission of the UW Farm is to be the campus center for the practice and study of urban agriculture and sustainability, and an educational, community-oriented resource for people who want to learn about building productive and sustainable urban landscapes.
With three farming locations on campus, the UW Farm offers year-round vegetable production for Housing and Food Services, a 50-member Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, and the University of Washington Food Pantry. 

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Cold? No Problem

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, (January 3 - 16, 2017)

The following conifers are among the cold-hardiest on earth!
1)   Abies balsamea                (Balsam Fir)

USDA Hardiness Zone 3: -40° to -30°F.
North American fir with range distribution as far north as Labrador, Canada.
Balsam fir is the most cold-hardy and aromatic of all firs.

2)   Juniperus communis                (Common Juniper)

USDA Hardiness Zone 2: -50° to -40°F.
The most widespread tree or shrub in the world! 

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January 2017 Plant Profile: Chimonanthus praecox

Chimonanthus praecox flower

Very fragrant, early flowering wintersweet will make you smile. Experience it for yourself in the Arboretum’s Witt Winter Garden.

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Jan 4, 2017 / News / UWBG Communication Staff

UW Opens Search for New Botanic Gardens Director

The UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences opened the application process for the tenure track faculty position of Director for the UW Botanic Gardens. The position is open until filled.
UWBG has an international reputation for horticulture, restoration ecology, urban forestry, sustainable urban systems, conservation and plant collections.  It manages 320 acres of collections and research areas, has a staff of over 40, and an annual budget of $2.7 million.

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Jan 4, 2017 / News / Rare Care

Symbols of resilience for a new year

Astragalus misellus var. pauper

If you’re looking for a symbol of resilience and survival for the new year – perhaps, even, a symbol of the ability to endure trial by fire with beauty and grace – consider Whited’s penstemon, pauper milk-vetch, yellow lady’s slipper or the dwarf evening-primrose.
During the 2016 monitoring season, several agency partners asked Rare Care to devote monitoring efforts to populations affected by 2014 and 2015 wildfires that burned approximately 1 1/2 million acres. 

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Happy Holidays from the Washington Park Arboretum!

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (12/20/16 - 1/3/17)

1)   Calocedrus decurrens                Incense Cedar

This native of Oregon and south to Baja California was first described by Colonel John C. Fremont in 1846.
Incense cedar is often confused with Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata), but is distinguished by its branchlets being held vertically, its narrow pyramidal habit, and by the lack of white stomata on the leaf undersides.
Located north of the Wilcox Bridge (marked by a sign) and east of the Pinetum Loop Trail. 

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Dec 9, 2016 / Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

A glimpse into the past – the Director’s Holiday Open House

For 13 years, the Director’s Holiday Open House was a tradition for all University of Washington Botanic Gardens staff (from the Center for Urban Horticulture and Washington Park Arboretum), Arboretum staff from the City of Seattle, all volunteers, Arboretum Foundation board members, and other friends and dignitaries. It began when John A. Wott moved to the Washington Park Arboretum in 1993 to become the first on-site director in many years. 

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Winter Quarter Native Plant Nursery Internships

The UW student chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration’s (SER-UW) native plant nursery is located on campus at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH). It is a student run operation that provides plants to the on-campus restoration projects that SER-UW manages. This year, with the support of a Campus Sustainability Fund grant, the nursery is expanding by developing experiments and curriculum on plant propagation and production. 

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