February 2017 Plant Profile: Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’

flowers of Hamamelis 'Jelena'

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’ has long been one of the most popular of the hybrid witch hazels.  Flowers appear as a bright copper-orange from a distance.  Closer inspection reveals a bicolored flower, being reddish at the base but changing to more of an orange yellow at the tip.  Although it has relatively little scent compared to the intoxicatingly fragrant Hamamelis mollis, it is prized for its flower color.   

Read more

The New Zealand Dead Look

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, January 17 - 31, 2017

New Zealand has a large number of shrubs with small tough leaves and wiry interlacing branches – divaricates. Some even have brown or grey new growth, giving a dead-like appearance. It is suggested that this may be a defensive mechanism to deter browsing moa (extinct flightless birds).
1)  Coprosma propinqua                (Mingimingi)

A visiting New Zealand scholar once described Coprosma as “a genus without morals that hybridizes incessantly” as she was politely telling us she didn’t think we were actually growing true Coprosma propinqua. 

Read more

Progress on the new Arboretum Loop Trail

If you’ve recently visited the Washington Park Arboretum, you may have noticed the new Arboretum Loop Trail is taking shape. Crews have continued to make progress through a very wet fall and cold winter, and they hope to open the first section in mid-February.
Part of the Arboretum’s long-term Master Plan, the project creates 1.2 miles of new trail, completing a 2.5 mile loop. 

Read more

Helping Gardens Grow: How volunteers nurture new plants to support the Arboretum Foundation

If you’ve ever wandered the Washington Park Arboretum delighting in the year-round plant displays and wishing you could take a piece of the experience home, then be sure to explore the Pat Calvert Greenhouse on your next visit.
The greenhouse—and the volunteer effort behind it—were established by its namesake in 1959. Pat Calvert was inspired to create a space for Arboretum Foundation members to practice propagation, and she worked with the Foundation to secure funds to build the structure and start the program. 

Read more

Jan 10, 2017 / Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

A glimpse into the past – a Volunteer Thank You

University of Washington Botanic Gardens staff preparing and serving the food.

All non-profit organizations live and breathe with volunteers. The University of Washington Botanic Gardens counts on hundreds of volunteers and has prospered with their help for over 75 years. The major support group for the Washington Park Arboretum is the Arboretum Foundation, and the Northwest Horticultural Society supports many aspects of the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Elisabeth C. Miller Library. 

Read more

Jan 10, 2017 / News / Wendy Gibble

Plant Conservation Internships with Rare Care

Washington Rare Plant Care and Conservation (Rare Care) at the University of Washington Botanic Gardens is accepting applications for two internship positions available for the spring and summer of 2017. Interns will work on a broad array of plant conservation science projects on public lands in Washington and gain familiarity with the tools used to manage sensitive plant species.
Rare Care is dedicated to conserving Washington’s native rare plants through methods including ex situ conservation, reintroduction, research, rare plant monitoring, and education.We build partnerships with public agencies and non-governmental organizations to manage and conserve rare native plant species. 

Read more

2017 UW Student Farm Staff Positions

The University of Washington Farm (UW Farm) is a student-run farm on the UW-Seattle campus. The mission of the UW Farm is to be the campus center for the practice and study of urban agriculture and sustainability, and an educational, community-oriented resource for people who want to learn about building productive and sustainable urban landscapes.
With three farming locations on campus, the UW Farm offers year-round vegetable production for Housing and Food Services, a 50-member Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, and the University of Washington Food Pantry. 

Read more

Cold? No Problem

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, (January 3 - 16, 2017)

The following conifers are among the cold-hardiest on earth!
1)   Abies balsamea                (Balsam Fir)

USDA Hardiness Zone 3: -40° to -30°F.
North American fir with range distribution as far north as Labrador, Canada.
Balsam fir is the most cold-hardy and aromatic of all firs.

2)   Juniperus communis                (Common Juniper)

USDA Hardiness Zone 2: -50° to -40°F.
The most widespread tree or shrub in the world! 

Read more

January 2017 Plant Profile: Chimonanthus praecox

Chimonanthus praecox flower

Very fragrant, early flowering wintersweet will make you smile. Experience it for yourself in the Arboretum’s Witt Winter Garden.

Read more
Back to Top