Happy Holidays from Your UWBG Horticulture Staff!

We invite you to enjoy our “Game of Groves”.

Can you name the following iconic tree groves based on the photos shown and hints below?

Photo of Ilex opaca, American Holly grove

#1)

I am a grove of nine broadleaf evergreen trees with berries that are commonly used as Christmas greens.  My location is an “island” in the middle of the ocean surrounding our five Pacific Rim flora.  Mostly planted in 1948-1950, I represent several cultivars of this American species.

 

Photo of Sassafras albidum var. molle, Sassafras grove

#2)

I am a thicket now of a deciduous tree species endemic to eastern North America and planted in 1937!  My roots used to be used to flavor the beverage root beer.  I can be found along Arboretum Drive growing under the backdrop of a Giant Sequoia near parking lot #7.

 

Photo of Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Tree grove

#3)

I am a grove of five trees known to be the tallest growing North American angiosperm.  My common name is the same as a popular spring bulb that is grown commercially in the Skagit Valley.  I am located in our Magnolia Collection and was planted in 1946.

 

Photo of Amelanchier X grandiflora, Serviceberry grove

#4)

I am most lovely in spring when in full bloom, and I provide lots of berries for birds in early summer and fall.  One of my common names harkens back to a time when I was a harbinger of spring for local priests to once again perform “services” after the ground had thawed.  I am an “orchard-like” grove located at the Center for Urban Horticulture and named after the late Marilou Goodfellow.

 

Photo of Sequoiadendron giganteum Giant Sequoia grove

#5)

I am a grove of the world’s most massive tree. Planted in 1944, I’m still just a youngster when it comes to age and size. I am one of several groves found in the Arboretum.

 

Photo of Sycopsis sinensis, Chinese Fighazel grove

#6)

I am a Chinese member of the Witch Hazel family donning evergreen “fig-like” leaves and small yellow “witch hazel-like” winter flowers with red anthers, hence my common name. There are 18 of me, planted in the early 1940s and am located in our present day Australia flora display.

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ANSWERS:

  1.   Ilex opaca, American Holly grove
  2.   Sassafras albidum var. molle, Sassafras grove
  3.   Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Tree grove
  4.   Amelanchier X grandiflora, Serviceberry grove
  5.   Sequoiadendron giganteum, Giant Sequoia grove
  6.   Sycopsis sinensis, Chinese Fighazel grove