Summer Fruit from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, August 14 - 27, 2017
Roy Farrow
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, August 14 – 27, 2017

1)   Corylus colurna                     Turkish Hazel

  • This native of SE Europe produces edible nuts inside intricately beaked husks.
  • This Corylus and other Birch Family members can be found near the terminus of Foster Island Road.

2)   Dipteronia sinensis

  • Dipteronia is a member of the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, which also includes Acer or maples, another winged-fruited genus.
  • As fall approaches, the fruit of Dipteronia will continue to ripen to a reddish-brown color.
  • Dipteronia sinenesis can be found within our Asiatic Maple Collection.
Close-up photo of the various Magnolia fruit
Roy Farrow
Close-up photo of the various types of Magnolia fruit

3)   Magnoliaceae                     Magnolia Family

  • The fruit of magnolias are often overlooked ornamentally, which is a shame as their fruit can easily be more decorative than the flowers of many other trees.
  • Technically an aggregate of follicles, the fruit of magnolias comes in many odd shapes, may turn bright red and open to reveal stunning orange-colored seeds.
  • Represented here: Magnolia cylindrica (lumpy), M. grandiflora (fuzzy when young), M. hypoleuca (horned ovoid), M. officinalis var. biloba (ovoid
    turns bright red in fall), M. sieboldii (peels open to reveal bright orange seeds in fall) and M. wilsonii (covered in a glaucous felt)
  • Also present: Liriodendron tuliperfera (okra-like and sticky from aphid honeydew)

Close-up photo of Magnolia fruit

4)   Ostrya carpinifolia                     Hop Hornbeam

  • This native from southern Europe to Syria produces hop-like fruit clusters.
  • Ostrya and other Birch Family members can be found toward the terminus of Foster Island Road.

5)   Pterocarya stenoptera                     Chinese Wingnut

  • All the species in the Pterocarya genus are large growing with aggressive root systems, which limit their usefulness in residential areas.
  • The inconspicuous spring flowers lead to handsome pendant spikes of winged fruit.
  • The Chinese wingnut can be found on the west side of Azalea Way, across from our lilacs.