February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (February 22, 2016 - March 7, 2016)
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum
(February 22, 2016 – March 7, 2016)

1)  Chaenomeles cathayensis                   Chinese Quince

  • This deciduous shrub is native to slopes and forest margins in western Hubei Province.
  • Light pink flowers in spring are followed by large oblong fruit which are unpalatable raw, but make fragrant jams and jellies when cooked.
  • Like other quince, Chaenomeles cathayensis’ arching branches are armed with stiff thorns.
  • Two specimens can be seen in the old field nursery south of the Crab Apple Meadow near Arboretum Drive.

2)  Corylopsis glabrescens         Japanese Winter Hazel

  • A broadly-spreading deciduous shrub native to Korea and Japan, this plant is noted for its graceful habit and fragrant yellow flowers in late winter.
  • A relative of witch hazel, Corylopsis are a great way to extend the bloom time of the winter landscape.
  • Some beautiful specimens can be seen on the trail to Azalea Way, west of the Witt Winter Garden.

3)  Cryptomeria japonica  ‘Nana’                     Dwarf Japanese Cedar

  • Introduced to England from China by Robert Fortune in 1842, this slow-growing conifer is one of the earliest cultivars.
  • Our specimen, planted in 1960, is located north of the grove of Sequoia sempervirens in the Pinetum.

4)  Osmanthus x burkwoodii                      Hybrid Sweet Olive

  • A hybrid of Osmanthus delevayi and Osmanthus decorus, this large evergreen shrub boasts the beauty of the former with the toughness and adaptability of the latter.
  • Small tubular white flowers exude a powerful jasmine fragrance in spring.
  • Several specimens can be seen along Foster Island Drive near the entrance to the maintenance yard.

5)  Sequoia sempervirens  ‘Henderson’s Blue’                    Henderson’s Blue Coast Redwood

  • This vigorous, blue-gray needled tree is a cultivar of the species native to the central and northern California coast.
  • The species is in the family Taxodiaceae, which also includes Sequoiadendron giganteum and Taxodium distichum, two important North American natives.
  • Located north of the grove of Sequoia sempervirens in the Pinetum.