Late January Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

Sleeping Beauties

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (January 25 - February 7, 2016)
Rare Care
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum
(January 25 – February 7, 2016)

1)  Oemleria cerasiformis                Indian Plum

  • The Indian Plum adheres to Benjamin Franklin’s advice in Poor Richards Almanac: “Early to bed, early to rise. . . .”  This shrub goes to sleep early, beginning to slowly defoliate in late summer.  However, it is one of the first to leaf out, and flowers early in the spring.  It can be found throughout the Arboretum, and is just beginning to awaken.

2)  Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’                          Black Mondo Grass

  • Black Mondo Grass lays low, waiting out the winter in subterranean insulation.  It stores up reserves in underground stems called rhizomes.  You can find this fine little ground cover in the Witt Winter Garden (http://botanicgardens.uw.edu/blog/tag/winter-garden/).

3)  Magnolia × soulangeana                Saucer Magnolia

  • The Saucer Magnolia wraps its flower buds in a fuzzy blanket for its winter nap.  As winter draws to a close and spring approaches, these buds will swell and open into a glorious pink and white show.  You can find this and many other specimens of this wonderful genus in our nationally-recognized Magnolia Collection (http://depts.washington.edu/uwbg/gardens/wpa/collections.php).

4)  Polystichum munitum                Western Sword Fern

  • The Western Sword Fern spends its winter in a tightly coiled bunch.  As they unfurl in spring, these are called fiddleheads, as they resemble the curled ornamentation (called a scroll) on the end of a stringed instrument, such as a violin.  Fiddleheads also just happens to be the name of the UW Botanic Gardens’ Nature Preschool Program (http://depts.washington.edu/uwbg/education/Youth/nature_preschool.shtml).

5)  Tsuga heterophylla                Western Hemlock

  • Not all the plants in the Arboretum are providing shade for Little Nemo in Slumberland.  Some plants, such as conifers like the Western Hemlock, do not go to sleep during the winter.  As long as it is not too cold, they will happily photosynthesize, converting water and air into sugar.