44 posts in Horticulture

Nov 29, 2016 / Washington Park Arboretum, Education, Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

Glimpse into the past – Puget Sound Rhododendron Hybrid Garden

Since the late 1930s, the Puget Sound region has been regarded by some as the best rhododendron growing region in the U.S.A., with documentation for over 2000 hybrid rhododendrons. Washington Park Arboretum has always been a leader in showcasing rhododendrons, including species and hybrids. The hybridization of rhododendrons was one of the legacies of both the former curator, Joe Witt, and the former director Brian O. 

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Nov 3, 2016 / Horticulture, News / UWBG Horticulturist

Fine (Evergreen) Foliage of Fall

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 31, 2016 - November 13, 2016)

1)   Arbutus unedo                    Strawberry Tree

Autumn brings bright white bell flowers and deep red-orange fruit, both of which are set off by the deep-green, leathery leaves.
Hidden under the foliage are attractive stems with shredding red-brown bark.

2)   Berberis (Mahonia) fortunei              Chinese Mahonia

Many evergreen Mahonias have excellent textural foliage, from large and bold to low and delicate.
Berberis fortunei can be found growing low to the ground on our Sino-Himalayan hillside. 

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Selected Mid-Autumn Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, October 17 - 30, 2016

1)   Araucaria araucana                Monkey Puzzle

Native to Chile and Argentina in the south central Andes mountains.
This long-lived tree is frequently described as a living fossil.
Large cones yield many edible nuts, similar to a pine nut.

2)   Berberis gagnepainii                                 Gagnepain’s Barberry

This evergreen shrub is native to China in the Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces.
Shrub is protected by many slender three-spined thorns. 

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Autumn Color Arrives at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 3 - 16, 2016)

1)  Sorbus alnifolia                                               (Korean Mountain Ash)

Native to central China, Korea and Japan this medium-sized tree boasts showy 2-3 inch umbrella-shaped clusters of 5-petal white flowers in late spring.
As summer yields to autumn, clusters of purple-red to orange-red ½ inch showy fruits appear and persist into winter.

2)  Gaultheria mucronata                                      (Prickly Heath)

Formerly known as Pernettya, this southern Chilean native spends the fall awash with showy globose berries in shades from deep plum to pink to white. 

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Conservation in Action

Few small ornamental trees offer so many attractive qualities in the landscape as the paperbark maple (Acer griseum). With its bright green leaves, coppery peeling bark, and vibrant fall color, this tree is highlighted in gardens across the country, and is specifically recognized as a Great Plant Pick for our region. At the University of Washington Botanic Gardens, we have six individual trees in our collections – one at the Center for Urban Horticulture and five at the Washington Park Arboretum. 

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The “Crown Jewels” of the Washington Park Arboretum

cuttings 9-7-16

A tribute to our late Director, Dr. Sarah Reichard.  May she forever garden in peace amongst a grove of Stewartia, her favorite tree.
[Editor’s Note: If you have time to experience their true beauty, it is highly recommended you visit our Stewartia Collection. The smart phone version of our interactive map can be used to pin-point specific locations and information for mature specimens of the species listed below. 

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Winter Garden Project: Remodeling the “Living Walls”

Arboretum Tree Removal Notification:
The week of 8/25/14, UWBG tree crew will embark on a project located in the Winter Garden (read about project below). 
4 western red cedars will be removed due to negative impact to plant collections and garden encroachment. 
All pedestrian path detours and other safety considerations will be handled by tree crew. 
If possible, cedar logs will be salvaged for future park uses.   

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Harbinger of Spring in Seattle – Flowering cherries on Azalea Way!

Most visitors experiencing the beauty of our historic Azalea Way flowering cherries from now through May probably have no idea of how intensive maintaining their health and prolonging their longevity truly is for the UW Botanic Gardens horticulture staff.   Just ask our Integrated Pest manager, Ryan Garrison. Ryan with staff support spends many a day throughout the year monitoring and controlling the numerous diseases and insect pests our 175 plus cherries are prone to suffer from.  

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Harbinger of Spring in Seattle – Early flowering cherries on Azalea Way!

Most visitors experiencing the beauty of our historic Azalea Way flowering cherries from now through May probably have no idea of how intensive maintaining their health and prolonging their longevity truly is for the UW Botanic Gardens horticulture staff.

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Notice of Garden Renovation: Soest Garden Specimen Tree

So after 13 years in the same raised bed, it’s time that one of our Persian Ironwood trees (Parrotia persica) be removed and replaced with another species.
It was suggested that every ten years or so, the specimen tree would be changed out to showcase different species that could be utilized to create the part shade environment intended for the perennials planted below. 

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