“Happy Thanksgiving!” Native Plants of Cape Cod

1)  Arctostaphylus uva-ursi                                                   ‘Vancouver Jade’            Kinnikinnick or Bearberry Broadleaf evergreen and creeping groundcover with circumpolar distribution in northern hemisphere often found growing in association with Pitch Pine If there were still bears on Cape Cod, it would be a favorite food source for them. This cultivar, ‘Vancouver Jade’ is growing in containers outside the Graham Visitor Center. 2)  Juniperus virginiana  ‘Blue Coast’                               Eastern Red Cedar A low growing, blue form of the Eastern Red Cedar Pioneer species found in mixed stands with Pitch Pine, reclaiming abandoned farms and grasslands Found growing under Pines in grid 36-4E, along nursery road 3)  Morella pensylvanica                Bayberry Berries boiled to extract sweet-smelling wax used to make clean-burning candles Found growing in dry open sites along with Bearberry, Eastern Red Cedar and Pitch Pine Mass growing in Oaks Collection in grid 43-B 4)  Pinus rigida                Pitch Pine Rigid cone scales and stiff needles, hence its Latin specific epithet Used during days of wooden ships due to its resistance to decay Several young specimens in our Pinetum, grid 37-4W 5)  Viburnum dentatum var. 

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November Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

1)  Berberis fortunei             Fortune’s Mahonia Native to China, this shrub sports deep-red new growth when grown in sunnier locations. The mature size is 6-12 feet tall and just as wide. This specimen is located in the Sino-Himalayan Collection (Grid 25-1W). 2)  Buxus wallichiana             Himalayan Boxwood A large shrub or small tree native to the northwestern Himalaya and known for very dense, hard wood. 

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October Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

1)  Cupressus (Hesperocyparis) bakeri                               Modoc Cedar A moderately-sized coniferous tree with greyish-green scale-like foliage that is dotted with white resin. It is native to the Siskiyou and Sierra Nevada Mountain ranges. A slow growing tree, usually under 90 feet over many decades. Considered vulnerable to extinction in the wild in the medium term. Located in the Pacific Connections Garden Cascadia Focal Forest above the Chilean Gateway. 

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October Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

1)  Cedrus atlantica ‘Glauca’                Blue Atlas Cedar A large coniferous tree with vivid, glaucous blue foliage, making it easy to identify. Native to Algeria and Morocco on the Atlas Mountains, these specimens can grow up to 100 feet tall and beyond. Located in the Pinetum near the Lynn Street play area. 2)  Cunninghamia lanceolata                China Fir Members of the family Taxodiaceae, these trees are named after James Cunningham, who originally found C. 

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A Wind in the Willows (and Cedars, Firs, Maples…)

How some trees react to high winds. 1)  Pseudotsuga menziesii                Douglas Fir The detritus lying on the ground following a wind event in the Pacific Northwest provides ample evidence of how P. menziesii defends itself against wind. The wood of P. menziesii is brittle and can snap. When a strong wind acts on a Douglas Fir, the tree sacrifices small pieces of foliage to shed the wind’s energy. 

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Pittosporum (Pitta=pitch, Sporum=seed) : August 17 - 30, 2015

Native to New Zealand (and Australia, Asia, and Africa). Flowers are sweetly scented and seeds are coated with a sticky substance giving the plant its name, pitch-seed. All plants below can be seen growing in the New Zealand Forest in the Pacific Connections Garden. 1)   Pittosporum eugenioides               Lemonwood New Zealand’s tallest Pittosporum, P. eugenioides can reach 40 feet. Its yellow-green leaves with curly edges have a strong scent of lemon when crushed. 

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Leafless in Seattle

1)  Clematis afoliata Native to the dry, eastern side of New Zealand. Now growing in our New Zealand Focal Forest. Eventually becomes a wiry mound with fragrant spring flowers. 2)  Hakea epiglottis Native to Tasmania and growing outside our Education Office. Hakea needs sun and dry, infertile soil. The round “stems” are true leaves despite their appearance. 3)  Phyllocladus aspleniifolius Another Tasmanian native, this tree prefers moist lowlands. 

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July Color Appears at the Center for Urban Horticulture

Featuring a Selection of Trees at the Center for Urban Horticulture 1)  Acer japonicum  ‘Aconitifolium’                         Fern Leaf Maple Grove of six located in McVay Courtyard Planted in 1986, original design element for McVay Courtyard Beautiful leaf texture with extraordinary fall color The most iconic tree at the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) 2)  Cedrus deodara             Deodar Cedar Two mature specimens located at northeastern entrance to Event Lawn (x from Greenhouse) The only conifers remaining from pre-CUH development Probably planted post-war years (1950s) for UW married student housing 3)  x Chitalpa tashkentensis  ‘Morning Cloud’                                                                           Morning Cloud Chitalpa An inter-generic cross between Catalpa bignonioides and Chilopsis linearis A hardy drought tolerant tree currently in flower, hence its cultivar namesake Several specimens located in bed along NE 41st Street, west entrance to CUH. 

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July Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

1)  Itea ilicifolia                Holly-leaved Sweet Spire Native to western China Evergreen shrub growing up to 16 feet tall and 10 feet wide Bears fragrant racemes of greenish-white flowers in late summer and fall Located west of the Magnolia Collection near the south end of the Asiatic Maples 2)  Lomatia myricoides                Long-leaf Lomatia Native to New South Wales in southeastern Australia One of the hardier members of the Proteaceae Honey-scented white flowers are much visited by bees in summer Located across Arboretum Drive from the New Zealand Focal Forest 3)  Pterocarya stenoptera                Chinese Wingnut Native to China Deciduous tree to 70 feet or greater, with a trunk diameter as large as 8 feet Located west of Azalea Way, north of Loderi Valley 4)  Quercus vacciniifolia                Huckleberry Oak Native to western North America, mountains of the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade Range Leaves and acorns are an important food source for birds and mammals within its native range. 

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June Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

1)  Quercus gilva                    Evergreen Oak Native to China and Japan Reaches heights of 90-100 feet in its native range Located in the Oak Collection along the South Oaks Extension Trail 2)  Rhododendron calophytum           Beautiful-face Rhododendron Native to China Large species rhododendron capable of becoming a tree Located along trail between Loderi Valley and the Woodland Garden 3)  Sequoia sempervirons  ‘Cantab’                     Coast Redwood A cultivar of the coast redwood with unique needles Specimens vary in form from shrubby to tree-like Located in the north end of the Pinetum, along the Pinetum Trail 4)  Thujopsis dolobrata                    Hiba Arborvitae A Japanese native Capable of reaching 100 feet or more in Japan, yet large specimens are rare in the Seattle area Located along the south slope of the Woodland Garden 5)  Viburnum rhytidophyllum                    Leatherleaf Viburnum Native to China Large evergreen shrub recorded to heights of 30 feet Located along the trail through the Viburnum Collection 

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