Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 5 - 18, 2017)

1)   Hydrangea heteromalla Wooly Hydrangea Native to China and the Himalayas. An arborescent shrub growing to an average 10 to 15 feet. Located in the Pacific Connections China Entry Garden, south of the shelter. 2)   Itea ilicifolia               Holly-leaved Sweet Spire Native to western China. Evergreen shrub, growing up to 16 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Bears fragrant racemes of greenish-white flowers in late summer and fall. 

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May Brings Forth Selected Cuttings from the Pacific Connections Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, May 22, 2017 - June 4, 2017

1)  Aristotelia chilensis                    Macqui This small evergreen tree is native to the Valdivian temperate rainforest of Chile and Argentina. This inconspicuous white flower yields a small black fruit, and is sometimes called Macqui or, Chilean Wineberry. This plant and New Zealand’s Mountain Wineberry (A. fruticosa) can both be found in the Pacific Connections Garden. 2)  Prostanthera cuneata                    Alpine Mint Bush This evergreen shrub is native to southeastern Australia. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum in May 2017

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, May 8 - 21, 2017

1)   Azara lanceolata This large shrub is native to Chile and Argentina. In spring, it is covered with fragrant yellow flowers. Azara lanceolata can be found near parking lots #4 and #5 along Arboretum Drive. 2)   Cytisus x praecox                Broom C. multiflorus x C. purgans Pale yellow flowers are produced in axillary clusters. Many Brooms and related plants are blooming now along Arboretum Drive in our legume collection. 

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Spring - Better Late Than Never!

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, April 24, 2017 - May 7, 2017

  1)   Acer palmatum  ‘Beni-maiko’                     Japanese Maple The name Beni-maiko means “red dancing girl”, referring to the brilliant red-to-pinkish foliage that emerges in the spring. This tree’s current color stands out vibrantly in the Woodland Garden. Beni-maiko has been recognized by the Royal Horticulture Society and given the Award of Garden Merit for several recent years.   2)   Erica arborea                     Tree Heath/Giant Heather Erica arborea is native to Africa, having populations in the Ethiopian Highlands, mountains of Ruwenzori, and the Cameroon Mountains. 

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“Pretty please, with a cherry on top!”

Selected cherry tree specimens from the Azalea Way Promenade at the Washington Park Arboretum (April 10-23, 2017)

The following are five of the best flowering cherries suitable for growing in the Pacific Northwest. All have good resistance to brown rot blossom blight disease and are good choices size-wise for the home garden.  All specimens below are currently in some stage of flowering along our historic Azalea Way Promenade. 1)   Prunus  x yedoensis  ‘Akebono’                 Daybreak Yoshino Cherry ‘Akebono’ (“Daybreak”) – This form has pinker flowers than the original Yoshino-type, and the petals are more frilled. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (March 27 - April 9, 2017)

1)   Acer triflorum                Three Flower Maple A small, slow-growing deciduous 20’ to 45’ tree, where it is native to Manchuria and Korea. An excellent landscape tree boasting light-grey vertically furrowed bark and vivid red and orange fall color. The specific epithet makes reference to its flowers, which are borne in clusters of three. This tree was discovered by noted plant explorer, Ernest H. 

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Spring Arrives at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum , March 13 - 20, 2017

1)   Cornus mas                     Cornelian Cherry A native of Europe, C. mas has been cultivated for centuries in Britain. Flowers are produced in February and March on the leafless stems in short-stalked umbels from the joints of the previous year’s wood. Oblong-ellipsoid, fleshy, bright red fruit are produced in late summer, and are edible when ripe. Found throughout the Arboretum, these shrubs or small trees are easily identified at this time. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden (Part II)

Selected cuttings from the Joseph Witt Winter Garden, February 13 - 26, 2017

1)  Corylopsis glabrescens                                    Winter Hazel This native of Korea and Japan teases us with flower buds that seem to be just on the edge of opening – for weeks! The Joseph Witt Winter Garden contains multiple species of Corylopsis so that people may compare and appreciate the subtle differences in form and flower color the genus Corylopsis offers. 2)  Pieris japonica                                                          Lily of the Valley Shrub The spring flowers and often the new growth of Pieris can be quite showy, but the buds themselves decorate our gardens throughout the winter months. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, January 30, 2017 - February 12, 2017

The Witt Winter Garden was originally designed and planted in 1949. In the late 1980s the garden was named after Joseph A. Witt, an Arboretum curator who had a special interest in winter ornamental plants. Here is a small sampling of plants to be enjoyed now in the Winter Garden. Download a map and plant list at: https://botanicgardens.uw.edu/washington-park-arboretum/gardens/joseph-a-witt-winter-garden/ 1)   Chimonanthus praecox                (Wintersweet) The 15’ tall arching stems host beautiful and aromatic creamy, yellowish flowers. 

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