November Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

1) Callicarpa japonica   (Japanese beautyberry) Native to Japan, the small metallic purple berries of this multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub are best viewed when the leaves have dropped beginning mid-to-late fall. The berries are an important survival food for birds and other animals. Beautyberry is just beginning to reflect its true glory in the Winter Garden. 2) Daphniphyllum macropodum It is one of the most handsome evergreens for foliage effects. 

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October Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

1) Arbutus unedo (Strawberry tree) Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 3 – 16, 2011)  Evergreen tree native to the Mediterranean and southwest Ireland, specifically the islands and shores of the Lakes of Killarney, where it attains its largest (40 ft. or more in height) dimensions. The flowers of A. unedo arrive late in the season, and are followed by the globose strawberry-like fruits that are orange-red in color. 

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September Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

Species of Sorbus are commonly known as whitebeam, rowan, service tree, and mountain ash. All these cuttings are from the Brian Mulligan Sorbus Collection, located to the east of Arboretum Drive across from the Magnolia Collection. 1) Sorbus aucuparia (European Rowan) Sorbus aucuparia is native to most of Europe except for the far south, and northern Asia. It is listed as a ‘Weed of Concern’ by the King County Noxious Weed Board because of its propensity to spread seeds far and wide via birds. 

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September Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

“C” is for Conifer 1)  Cedrus libanii ssp. atlantica ‘Aurea’ (syn. Cedrus atlantica ‘Aurea’) Native to the Atlas Mountains of Morocco Young leaves have a bright yellow cast, maturing to blue-green. This specimen is located in the North Pinetum. 2)  Chamaecyparis lawsoniana x pisifera Hybrid of the Japanese Sawara cypress and our own Port Orford cedar We have a specimen along the Pinetum Trail, south of the Wilcox Bridge. 

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