54 posts in Horticulture

Olive Olives: A Medley of Olive Family Members

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, October 29, 2018 - November 11, 2018

1)  Chionanthus virginicus                          Fringetree

This deciduous small tree or shrub is native to the southeastern United States.
Its common name refers to the slightly fragrant, spring-blooming flowers which feature airy, terminal, and drooping clusters (4-6″ long) of fringe-like, creamy white petals.
This cutting came from a shrubby specimen located east of the Arboretum Loop Trail and north of the Viburnums.

2)  Fraxinus americana ‘Rosehill’                          White Ash

This White ash cultivar ‘Rosehill’ is a seedless, broad-conical cultivar that typically grows 35-50’ tall. 

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Autumn Colors Appear at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, October 1 - 14, 2018

1)  Viburnum rhytidophyllum                     Leatherleaf Viburnum

This large evergreen shrub grows to 6-10 feet and is native to central and western China.
Fragrant creamy-white clusters of flowers emerge in spring, followed by berries in the fall that first appear red and change to glossy black.
You can view this shrub along the east side of the Arboretum Loop Trail in the Viburnum Collection. 

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Late Summer Colors Appear at the Washington Park Arboretum

Close-up photo of Castenea crenata fruit

1)  Castanea crenata                     Japanese Chestnut

Though it is one of the smaller species of chestnut, C. crenata is still a valued food tree in its native Japan. Ordinarily the nuts are also smaller than those of the European varieties.
This specimen is located on the east side of our field nursery along the gravel path.

2)  Cephalotaxus harringtonia var. ‘Nana’           Dwarf Plum Yew

Native to the forest understories of eastern Asia, this small, evergreen shrub is known to thrive in semi-shaded places rather than in full sunshine. 

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Intern Spotlight: Ilea Howard

Ilea Howard is completing an internship with UW Botanic Gardens this summer. She is a student at Oregon State University where she’s majoring in sustainability and horticulture. The internship, which runs June through August, will provide her with credit hours and experience trying new things, such as driving a tractor!
Before starting work each day, Ilea puts on her work pants and sturdy hiking boots. 

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Early Summer Interests at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, (July 16 - 29, 2018)

1)  Corylus colurna                     Turkish Hazelnut or Filbert

The Turkish Hazelnut is native to southeastern Europe into western Asia.
In summer, edible nuts are produced inside dramatically styled husks.
The Turkish Filbert can be found along Foster Island Road, opposite the Broadmoor gatehouse.

2)  Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Sumida-no-hanabi’                     Bigleaf Hydrangea

‘Sumida-no-hanabi’ translates to “fireworks over the Hanabi River”.
This wonderful hydrangea can be found in the Centennial Garden along Azalea Way. 

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New Arbor Installed in the Seattle Garden Club Fragrance Garden

On June 7, a new centerpiece was installed to enhance the Seattle Garden Club Fragrance Garden at the Center for Urban Horticulture. This beautiful arbor, designed by Tim Sharp of Iron Design Center NW, was a gift from the Seattle Garden Club, who has supported the Fragrance Garden both financially and with volunteer garden care since its installation in 2007. The Garden was extensively renovated and enhanced in 2015, and the arbor completes the design elements envisioned at that time. 

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Summer Flower Subtlety at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, June 18, 2018 - July 1, 2018

1)  Illicium henryi                    Henry Anise Tree

This attractive evergreen shrub is native to China.
It has star-shaped flowers in pink to deep crimson, anise-scented leaves when bruised and is tolerant of shade.
This specimen is located adjacent to the Lookout Loop Trail in the Asiatic Maple collection. Grid 25-1E, if using our mobile interactive plant map.

2)  Leptospermum scoparium                    Manuka

A broad-leafed evergreen shrub native to New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, New Zealand. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum for June 2018

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, June 4 - 17, 2018

1)  Kalmia latifolia                     Mountain Laurel

This attractive evergreen shrub is native to the eastern United States.
Has five-sided cup-shaped clusters of pink flowers.
The name honors Pehr Kalm (1715-1779) and latifoliia means “Broad Leafed”.

2)  Rhododendron occidentale                     Western Azalea

This deciduous shrub is native to the coasts of central and southern Oregon and California.
Fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers are borne in trusses and vary from white to pale rose, with or without a yellow blotch and sometimes streaked with darker rose markings. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, May 21, 2018 - June 3, 2018

1)  Enkianthus campanulatus                    Redvein Enkianthus

This attractive deciduous shrub is native to open woodlands in Japan.
Tiny bell-shaped, creamy-yellow to reddish flowers held together in clusters.
Small elliptic leaves turning bright red, orange and yellow in the fall.

2)  Davidia involucrata                     Handkerchief Tree

This deciduous tree is native to woodlands in central China.
Its small, reddish purple flower heads are surrounded by a pair of large, white bracts up to 30 cm. 

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Selected cuttings make their appearance in late March at the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, March 19, 2018 - April 1, 2018

1)  Berberis darwinii                     Darwin’s Barberry

This barberry was discovered in Chile by Charles Darwin in 1835 during his voyage on the Beagle.
Located in the Chilean entry garden of the Pacific Connections Garden, the red-tinted flower buds open to bright yellow-orange flowers.
The abundant summer fruit of this barberry is sweet and delicious as opposed to our native sour barberries (mahonias). 

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