40 posts in Horticulture

Fine Fall Food for Our Feathered and Feelered Friends

1)   Arbutus unedo           Strawberry Tree

Arbutus unedo specimens can be found surrounding the courtyard on the south side of the Graham Visitors Center.
As the fruit requires 12 months to ripen, both flowers and ripe fruit are present in the fall for an excellent display as well as food for both pollinators and other wildlife.
Varied thrush visit our courtyard in the winter to take advantage of the dense cover and fruit. 

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Fall and Winter Interests at the Washington Park Arboretum

Fall and Winter Interests at the Washington Park Arboretum, November 7-20, 2017

1)   Acer triflorum                              Three-flowered Maple

This is a small to medium-sized tree, native to northeastern China and Korea.
Exfoliating bark, three leaflets, and amazing fall color are some highlights of this tree.
Look for this tree, with one of the last displays of fall color for the season, in the Asiatic Maples collection.

2)   Callicarpa bodinieri                   Beautyberry

Most species in the genus, including this one, come from eastern and southeastern Asia, although this species can be found in Australia, Madagascar, North America, and South America. 

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Oct 27, 2017 / Horticulture, News / UWBG Horticulturist

A Fall Color Extravaganza is Happening in the Woodland Garden!

Outdoor photo of the Woodland Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum

Don’t delay, get your free “leaf peeper” tickets today!  See the most beautiful fall color show in Seattle.  Located in Woodland Garden on the south-facing slope (north side of Upper Pond).  And the star performers are:
 
1)   Acer palmatum  ‘Ogon sarasa’

A Japanese maple cultivar whose name means “gold calico cloth”.
This shorter-statured large shrub is in the lower right foreground when viewing scene from the south side of Upper Pond. 

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West Side Story

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 9 - 22, 2017)

1)   Cedrus atlantica ‘Aurea’

Native to the Atlas Mountains of Morocco and Algeria, C. atlantica ‘Aurea’ is a slow-growing, conical tree with golden yellow foliage. As the tree matures, its needles turn to a greener color.
Atlas cedars can grow to 120 feet in height, but this cultivar tops out at about half that.
A member of the Pinaceae (Pine family), this specimen is located in the north Pinetum near 26th Avenue East and East McGraw Street. 

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September’s Super Days Of Service In The Arboretum

Thanks to spot on planning and recruitment by our partner, Arboretum Foundation, and cooperative PNW weather, two of our biggest community service events during the year were a huge success!
We celebrated United Way Day of Caring on September 15, when 130 volunteers representing 6 companies; Nordstrom, Sonos, Fred Hutch, Google, IMPINJ, Microsoft and Chase Bank, participated in 7 arboretum projects led by UW Botanic Gardens horticulture and Seattle Parks and Recreation staff. 

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Summer Fruit from the Washington Park Arboretum

Close-up photo of the various Magnolia fruit

1)   Corylus colurna                     Turkish Hazel

This native of SE Europe produces edible nuts inside intricately beaked husks.
This Corylus and other Birch Family members can be found near the terminus of Foster Island Road.

2)   Dipteronia sinensis

Dipteronia is a member of the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, which also includes Acer or maples, another winged-fruited genus.
As fall approaches, the fruit of Dipteronia will continue to ripen to a reddish-brown color. 

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Summer Interests from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 31, 2017 - August 14, 2017)

1)   Abies concolor                     White Fir

This tall conifer, native to the mountains of western North America, adds an interesting silvery blue backdrop to our Legume collection.
The young trees are valuable in the Christmas tree trade for their ornamental look.
The specimens in grid 16-6E were planted in 1938.

2)   Acer davidii                     David’s Maple

This tree is named in honor of French priest and naturalist Armand David, who first described the species while on mission in central China. 

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Our Heralded Hydrangeas

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum, (July 17 - 31, 2017)

1)   Hydrangea aspera subsp. robusta

This 10-foot shrub with large fuzzy leaves produces flat, light blue flowers to 12” across on petioles which may reach 14” or more!
Native to the region between the Himalayas, across southern China, to Taiwan.
This 1941 specimen is located in the Camellias, next to Franklin tree along Arboretum Drive.

2)   Hydrangea heteromalla                               Wooly Hydrangea

A tree-like hydrangea native to China and the Himalayas. 

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Selected Cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 5 - 18, 2017)

1)   Hydrangea heteromalla
Wooly Hydrangea

Native to China and the Himalayas.
An arborescent shrub growing to an average 10 to 15 feet.
Located in the Pacific Connections China Entry Garden, south of the shelter.

2)   Itea ilicifolia               Holly-leaved Sweet Spire

Native to western China.
Evergreen shrub, growing up to 16 feet tall and 10 feet wide.
Bears fragrant racemes of greenish-white flowers in late summer and fall. 

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July Plant Profile: Hydrangea integrifolia

Originally posted July 1, 2014
An evergreen hydrangea?!!  You betcha!
There are very few evergreen vines for gardeners in the Pacific Northwest, but this gorgeous gem from Asia is  becoming more readily available and it’s simply one of the coolest flowers you’ll ever get to witness opening.
From plump, peony-like buds, they begin to slowly crack open, a froth of fertile flowers begin to form and over the course of a few days, a flat umbel “lacecap” begins to form. 

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