63 posts in Center for Urban Horticulture

Reflections of a Rare Care intern: Wading through head-high nettles and scarifying seeds

Myesa Legendre-Fixx spent the summer as an intern for the Rare Plant Care and Conservation Program (Rare Care). She completed her Bachelor of Science in Biology and Oceanography at UW June 2017.
Working as a Rare Care intern has been a thrilling summer! Over the summer, Ceci and I monitored 17 different plant populations, did 10 seed collections, worked with the US Bureau of Land Management doing rare plant and weed surveys and fire severity assessments of burned areas, improved the seed vault and started almost 500 seeds of Whited’s milk-vetch (Astragalus sinuatus) for an outplanting. 

Read more

August 2017 Plant Profile: Oxydendrum arboreum

Oxydendrum arboreum is a beautiful summer flowering tree with dramatic fall foliage.

Read more

July Plant Profile: Hydrangea integrifolia

Originally posted July 1, 2014
An evergreen hydrangea?!!  You betcha!
There are very few evergreen vines for gardeners in the Pacific Northwest, but this gorgeous gem from Asia is  becoming more readily available and it’s simply one of the coolest flowers you’ll ever get to witness opening.
From plump, peony-like buds, they begin to slowly crack open, a froth of fertile flowers begin to form and over the course of a few days, a flat umbel “lacecap” begins to form. 

Read more

Hydrangeas, Crape Myrtles and Giant Himalayan Lilies: Summer Delights at the Botanic Gardens

Summer is a great time to visit the UW Botanic Gardens and offers the best weather of the year to enjoy blooms and botanically interesting walks.

Read more

May 24, 2017 / History, Center for Urban Horticulture, Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

Glimpse into the past – the Master Gardener Plant Sale

Master Gardener Tent 2017

During the first weekend in May 2017, the Master Gardener Foundation of King County held its annual Spring Plant Sale and Garden Market on the grounds of the Center for Urban Horticulture.  As I browsed the vendors displaying plants and other garden art, I was impressed as to how much has changed as well as how much is still the same. 

Read more

April 2017 Plant Profile: Corylopsis pauciflora

 
Corylopsis pauciflora, the buttercup winter hazel, is one of the most charming plants in the witch hazel family.  It features unique and colorful leaves, attractive and lightly fragrant flowers, fall color and is a good size for smaller gardens.  It is the smallest and most compact growing member of the genus.  The genus name means resembling (“opsis”) the leaf of a Corylus, or common hazel (though they are not related).   

Read more

Mar 27, 2017 / Center for Urban Horticulture, Miller Library, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

Glimpse into the past – Honoring the Career of Valerie Easton

The long-term success of an institution often resides in the vision, dexterity, intellect, ambition and intuitiveness of an individual. On February 22, 2017, Valerie Easton announced that she was no longer writing her weekly column in the Pacific NW Magazine, bringing her 25 year career there to an end. For me, it seems like Val only recently started as the Library Manager at the Elisabeth C. 

Read more

February 2017 Plant Profile: Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’

flowers of Hamamelis 'Jelena'

Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’ has long been one of the most popular of the hybrid witch hazels.  Flowers appear as a bright copper-orange from a distance.  Closer inspection reveals a bicolored flower, being reddish at the base but changing to more of an orange yellow at the tip.  Although it has relatively little scent compared to the intoxicatingly fragrant Hamamelis mollis, it is prized for its flower color.   

Read more

Jan 10, 2017 / Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture, News / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

A glimpse into the past – a Volunteer Thank You

University of Washington Botanic Gardens staff preparing and serving the food.

All non-profit organizations live and breathe with volunteers. The University of Washington Botanic Gardens counts on hundreds of volunteers and has prospered with their help for over 75 years. The major support group for the Washington Park Arboretum is the Arboretum Foundation, and the Northwest Horticultural Society supports many aspects of the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Elisabeth C. Miller Library. 

Read more

Dec 9, 2016 / Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture / John A. Wott, Director Emeritus UW Botanic Gardens

A glimpse into the past – the Director’s Holiday Open House

For 13 years, the Director’s Holiday Open House was a tradition for all University of Washington Botanic Gardens staff (from the Center for Urban Horticulture and Washington Park Arboretum), Arboretum staff from the City of Seattle, all volunteers, Arboretum Foundation board members, and other friends and dignitaries. It began when John A. Wott moved to the Washington Park Arboretum in 1993 to become the first on-site director in many years. 

Read more
Back to Top